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The Linux Thread

Need to install Linux on a laptop again. The issue comes with the time consuming process of copy pasting config files from main computer, to pen drive, to laptop. Along with installing everything manually just to then configure everything.

I've distrohopped and had fresh installs, but I'm wondering if anyone has a better way to do what I described here.
I would have just installed Mint or something on that laptop, but I can pretty much only use i3 due to battery. i3 is unusable to me with the default binds and most of the other default settings.
You can do this in a variety of ways. The most popular one would be is to host your .config folder on a git server then just do a git clone on the home directory of the new Linux box whenever you need it. But that wouldn't solve the "installing programs" bit of the initial setup. For that, it would be a bit tricky. I haven't done that on all distros and UNIX-likes but on the ones that I did (Gentoo, OpenBSD) they provide a way to create "installation lists" that you can just pass to the package manager (portage/pkg) to autoinstall your third-party packages.

For Gentoo, you can create portage sets and just copy that over to the new machine then do # emerge --ask @your-set.
For OpenBSD, you can use UNIX pipes to create a package list for your current install to a text file: $ pkg -mz | tee my-list then just pipe the list in to your new OBSD install: # pkg -l my-list.
 
The most popular one would be is to host your .config folder on a git server then just do a git clone on the home directory of the new Linux box whenever you need it
The issue that arises in this is making it public, or having a password on it that would require fiddling with. I'm not sure in general, I barely use git. I know cloning is pretty easy, though.

But that wouldn't solve the "installing programs" bit of the initial setup. For that, it would be a bit tricky. I haven't done that on all distros and UNIX-likes but on the ones that I did (Gentoo, OpenBSD) they provide a way to create "installation lists" that you can just pass to the package manager (portage/pkg) to autoinstall your third-party packages.
I tried writing a .sh script, but that would be tricky to change from flash drive to the home directory on a minimal install. The video I posted on this thread has a shell script like that as well.
 
Thanks for bumping the thread by the way.

One issue I'm having right this moment (technically fixed a few moments ago) is screen tearing on that same laptop. Fixed it with picom, but picom by itself uses up resources. What do you guys use for setup with a compositor? I never had an use for it, but this screen tearing was troubling a few things.
 
The issue that arises in this is making it public, or having a password on it that would require fiddling with. I'm not sure in general, I barely use git. I know cloning is pretty easy, though.
Yup. You could create a private git repo in Git{hub,lab,tea} to solve that but then you're just adding complexity on top of an already complex chain. What I personally do for quick and dirty setups is just create a dump of my latest /home/$USER/.config using tar and just transfer that using a USB stick or over the network using scp. For a more consistent solution, I would probably just deploy a NAS on my local network where my hosts periodically tar -> rsync their /home and have those timestamped.

I tried writing a .sh script, but that would be tricky to change from flash drive to the home directory on a minimal install.
Shell scripts are alright, but my issue with them is that they require upkeep whenever you update the programs on your minimal install. Portage sets are a bit that way, as well, and I find that cumbersome after a while. I prefer the OBSD way of doing things: $ pkg -mz | my-list, then # pkg -l my-list but as long as your approach works for you then you should keep at it.

What do you guys use for setup with a compositor?
Picom is probably the best that you've got if you're going to use xorg.
 
Yeah, no I mean when you decide that your minimal install list needs tweaking where you add or remove packages from that list.
The thing with the list is that I try to keep it basic. Stuff like bluetooth you just need one package, and no one will really say "ah jeez, I gotta remove Xorg to avoid the bloat!" This is kind of an exaggeration, but that's also kind of the point. Packages are really the thing I update the least, and when I really need to replace them, I just slightly modify the script with stuff like switching PCmanFM for Thunar, or simple changes.
I always check on a new install if I'm installing something bad on the script, but I barely get that. Issues arise only when I'm switching distros, or Debian having the proprietary list that you have to comment out.
 
The thing with the list is that I try to keep it basic. Stuff like bluetooth you just need one package, and no one will really say "ah jeez, I gotta remove Xorg to avoid the bloat!" This is kind of an exaggeration, but that's also kind of the point. Packages are really the thing I update the least, and when I really need to replace them, I just slightly modify the script with stuff like switching PCmanFM for Thunar, or simple changes.
I always check on a new install if I'm installing something bad on the script, but I barely get that. Issues arise only when I'm switching distros, or Debian having the proprietary list that you have to comment out.
GUI is bloat, run your entire computing experience from the TUI, you username would then check out 🧌
 
It seems to not affect most distros, only those on testing or bleeding edge - and most already have a remediation for it, thank goodess.

Could have been a massive breach though because of how widespread the compression software is, and ships as default to most flavours of Linux.
 
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